All Meat Stocks

General proportions of ingredients for all stocks except fish stock

  • 4 liters Water
  • 2 Kg Raw bones
  • ½ Kg Hard Vegetables (onion, carrot, celery, leeks)
  • 1 Piece Bouquet Garni (thyme, bay leafs, parsley stalks)
  • ½ Pc Whole Garlic Bulb (not a segment the whole thing)
  • A dozen assorted peppercorns
  • 60 Grams Tomato Paste (Brown stocks only)

General method to make all types of white stocks

  1. Chop all bones and remove any fat.
  2. Place in a large thick bottomed pot and fill with cold water.
  3. Bring it to a slow simmer.
  4. As the stock comes to a simmer, scum will form in the centre as it is pushed from the outside of the pot, this has to be skimmed off with a ladle or spoon and discarded.
  5. When it is simmering without any more accumulation of foam or scum, the other ingredients can be added.
  6. The stock should be simmered for at least 8 hours, for optimum results and to ensure that all the flavour is out of the bones, they should be simmered until the bones can be crumbled with your thumb nail.
  7. When the stock is simmered for a long period of time, clean cold water can be added to top up the stock level due to the ongoing evaporation process.

General method to make all types of brown stocks

  1. Chop all bones and lay them in a heavy roasting tray.
  2. Carefully roast the bones without burning (burning will make the stock bitter)
  3. When the bones are golden brown, drain off all oil.
  4. Add the bones to a large thick bottomed pot and fill with cold water.
  5. Pour most of the oil out of the roasting pan and then add the tomato paste.
  6. Cook on top of a stove for 5 minutes then add the hard vegetables & Garlic bulb.
  7. Stir until golden brown, again without burning.
  8. Add all ingredients to the bones in the pan.
  9. Bring it to a slow simmer.
  10. As the stock comes to a simmer, scum will form in the centre as it is pushed from the outside of the pot, this has to be skimmed off with a ladle or spoon and discarded. (you must ensure that you do not skim off all the ingredients you just added when you do this).
  11. The stock should be simmered for at least 8 hours, for optimum results and to ensure that all the flavour is out of the bones, they should be simmered until the bones can be crumbled with your thumb nail.
  12. Every few hours any scum or oil collecting in the middle of the pot again, has to be skimmed off.
  13. When the stock is simmered for a long period of time, clean cold water can be added to top up the stock level due to the ongoing evaporation process.

 

 

Notes:

When making stocks, especially meat stocks, they should be a labour of love and lots of care has to be taken to ensure the stock has the most flavour possible. Every day you can go through the fridge to find any bits and pieces of hard vegetables, tomatoes, herbs or even small scraps of the types of meat the stock is derived from and add them to the “works in progress” (all meat must be browned first before being added). However the stock pot is not a garbage bin to add all rotten ingredients that have to be used up, always remember, Garbage in Garbage out! The “Stock Pot” can be simmering for up to a week at a time, whilst the chefs keep scooping off the contents of the pot with a ladle as they use it to make soups or sauces during service. The better the quality of the stock, the better the quality of the soups and sauces made form the stock. Most of the televised cooking shows do not explain the importance of the quality of stock when making any dishes that require it, the difference to the end result is astounding.

You never, ever boil a stock as this will ensure that impurities in the liquid will boil back into the stock making the stock cloudy and dull. When the stock is cloudy, the finished sauce made form this stock will be light brown in colour and will not have the dark clear shine to it when added to any dish and will not be impressive when spooned on a white dinner plate. Stocks can be made from all bones including, beef, chicken, veal, pheasant, duck, lamb and so on and so forth. When serving any meat, the stock to make the sauce should be the same as the meat being served, when serving duck for example, duck stock should be used to make the sauce to match the meat being served and thereby increase the taste and aroma of the dish.